Friday, April 3, 2009

Sigh. I have so much work to do.

Didn't I already cover this: tulips on campus?

Seems to me that it is one of the many reasons our fair campus earned this distinction.

Here is my post on what I like about our campus landscaping: homage to place

10 comments:

  1. Hmm, yes, one would hope that an institution of higher learning might want to set an example for the students... the next generation of decision makers. Seems to me that saving money on water use could free up some funds to be applied to the new "green" building.. huh, waddya think? Take some savings up front instead of waiting for the "green" savings to roll in later.

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  2. An 18 year old having some sensible ideas on conserving water etc - and he has to be ignored because he's too young!
    Perhaps sensible people don't write in because they have knocked themselves unconscious beating their heads against a brick wall (lol)

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  3. Somehow the word tradition has taken on a secondary meaning...Sacred! It's hard to get folks to move away from tradition when it's loaded like that~~gail

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  4. My daughter's Honours thesis was the compilation of months of stats that resulted in a measurement of water used by Acadia University (Wolfville, NS) and ways to achieve greater sustainability, so the topic, at least, is near and dear to my heart. :) But I somehow doubt that a few beds of tulips would create the greatest problem, if, indeed, there is one at all.

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  5. Take heart Susan. You are not alone. My husband teaches at another 'Tech' campus here and it's the students with some faculty that are manning the charge for recycling etc there. The administration (and our city I might add) can't be bothered with it. It is sad but I do think things will change. It just comes slowly to the hinterlands.

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  6. Michelle, EG, Gail, Jean--Yes, change comes slowly. These are all good people, with good intentions. They just need to read my earlier post about learning to be proud of our native landscape. That said...

    Nancy--I agree, the tulips probably don't cause the water shortage, but they are symptomatic of a deeper problem here, which is why I pick on them. Unfair to the tulip, sadly. :-)

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  7. I especially like the advertisement above the story in the online newspaper for "Greenlawn" Church of Christ. That sort of sums up the kind of cluelessness that afflicts perfectly well-intentioned people when it comes to energy and resources. In my town in the southern Rockies, a high-desert climate that averages 10 inches of precipitation a year, we have lawns and shade in all the city parks because our Public Services Director loves big machines and doesn't know what to do with a landscape that can't be mowed by a riding mower. Ah, for intelligent planning and planting that honors the landscapes where we live!

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  8. Does anybody happen to know what happens to the bulbs after they've bloomed? If you read the TTU tulip rah-rah link, you'll note that the bulbs are planted every November. They aren't accumulating, they're dug up--but then what? Discarded? Saved and replanted? (If so, where?)

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  9. Wow, Dr. T. I definitely commented on that A-J article last fall, the "zwizh413" comment.

    I'm glad you have this blog. It's nice to be able to keep contact with past professors and still feel like I know a bit of what's going on around Tech.

    Natalie McCoy

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  10. Susan--LOL! I hadn't noticed that, but it is ironic, isn't it?

    Nancy--No idea what happens to the discards. I think that TTU grows a lot of its own plants, though. WHere this happens, I don't know, since I've never seen a facility that could house it.

    Natalie--that was you? Good post!

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