Sunday, November 2, 2008

What to do on an autumn Sunday morning

I spent much of my childhood in New Mexico, and as a consequence, I cook with a lot of roasted chiles. I'll buy them at the supermarket and roast them myself when they are in season, and the rest of the year I'll use canned Hatch chiles, but this is my first year to grow them. I am simply amazed at how much more flavorful they are when they come straight from my backyard.

The weather seemed just right for harvesting and roasting the remainder of the poblano peppers this morning. I've been freezing them up in small cooking portions. They probably won't last for more than a few weeks, but it was worth the extra effort to grow them myself. Come some frosty winter evening, I'll be savoring some green chile stew and be reminded of autumn mornings.

9 comments:

  1. Green chili stew. I need a recipe. That sounds yummy

    ReplyDelete
  2. Yes you will. Good job-they look delish.

    ReplyDelete
  3. I'll be sure to post the recipe, Debbie! I make a mean green chile stew...

    And thanks, Tina!

    ReplyDelete
  4. Mmmmm, poblanos. I remember eating green chile sauce on eggs for breakfast in Santa Fe, is there any meal they don't get put in?! Your look amazing!

    ReplyDelete
  5. I might try growing those next year as I'm looking for a chilli that isn't very hot. I've never roasted chillies before using them, presumably this improves the flavour? I get the heat effect but I think I'm missing out on flavour somehow. So much to learn!

    ReplyDelete
  6. Hi Karen--New Mexicans put them in nearly every dish. I have dual citizenship (Texas and New Mexico ;-)), so I only put them in about half my recipes. Ha!

    ReplyDelete
  7. Roasting really does improve the flavor, and poblanos are indeed a milder chile. Keep them consistently well-watered during the growing season, though, as I understand that keeps the heat down.

    Roasting is easy if you have a gas stove--just hold them over the flame on the stove top or put them under the broiler. Its even easier with an outdoor grill--just put them on the grate. Turn when the skin begins to blister and turn black. When all the sides are done, put them in a container and cover with a lid to steam them. After they are cool, open them up and take out the seeds (I rinse them under the faucet).

    ReplyDelete
  8. Oh! I forgot to say that after the peppers have steamed, you should also rub the blistered skin off, and then remove the seeds.

    ReplyDelete
  9. Thanks Susan - I'll definitely give that a try

    ReplyDelete